Wendi Men
       
     
Valpuri Karinen
       
     
pablo velasco
       
     
Syreen Monshi
       
     
Яachel Lee
       
     
Ottelien Huckin
       
     
Louise Spence
       
     
Lia Chiarin
       
     
Holly Dickinson
       
     
Gemma Batchelor
       
     
Evelyn Hollow
       
     
Connie Hurley
       
     
Brodie Childs
       
     
Anna Vesaluoma
       
     
Alexandra Roddan
       
     
Alex Weir
       
     
Claire Pearce
       
     
Michael Kay
       
     
Rootmap
       
     
Stephanie Wilson
       
     
Connie Zhong
       
     
Naomi Buchan
       
     
Softbox Collective
       
     
Keiran Mitchell
       
     
Heather Davidson
       
     
Klaus Pinter
       
     
Tiki Muir
       
     
Thane Katsillis
       
     
Elizabeth Bevington
       
     
Kirstin McDonald
       
     
Sorour Fattahi
       
     
Lizzie Quirke
       
     
Anete Tišānova
       
     
Green Funky
       
     
Elsa Kyander
       
     
Fionnuala Mottishaw
       
     
Beichen Yu
       
     
Auguste Greiciute
       
     
Megan Rea
       
     
Shauna Emig
       
     
Alice Lazarus
       
     
GLUE Collective
       
     
Erin Semple
       
     
Mairead Keating
       
     
Michelle Foster
       
     
Genevieve Murray
       
     
Wendi Men
       
     
Wendi Men

Wendi’s work reflects on the relationship between space and memories, and the unnoticed everyday moments of the beauty of lights and shadows. When confusion comes, when vision is hazy, when flash passes, when memory is vanishing, when dream shines, when shadow dies.

Valpuri Karinen
       
     
Valpuri Karinen

Valpuri’s screen-prints showcase portraits of famous botanists with their findings. She is inspired by narratives, characters and historical figures, as well as horticulture, and myths.

pablo velasco
       
     
pablo velasco

Black River explores the combination of physical medium -six hanging scrolls- and virtual media – a video of a moving black river that stitches the paintings (projected as well) together. It is a visual expression of the artists’ 3-month long journey through Japan in the footsteps of 17th century haiku poet Basho, reflecting an unchanged search for stillness.

Syreen Monshi
       
     
Syreen Monshi

Syreen’s practice attempts to express the meaning of “All is fair in love& war” through a combination of graphics and the complex and exotic letters of the Arabic alphabet.

Яachel Lee
       
     
Яachel Lee

Rearranged syntactically, Hair I Am becomes "I Am Hair", a declaration of being defined by society based on the semiotics of appearance. Homonymously, Hair I Am becomes "Here I Am", a declaration of the artist being present in her hair.

Ottelien Huckin
       
     
Ottelien Huckin

Ottelien’s painting is a scene of comfortable, unfazed nudity between two.

Louise Spence
       
     
Louise Spence

Louise’s “Bird in the Hand’ showcases the curious nature of idioms across various languages and cultures through the medium of black and white film photography.

Lia Chiarin
       
     
Lia Chiarin

In their debut collaborative piece, Sophie and Lia aim at extending an existing space, through the use of paint and objects, creating an imaginary world for the viewer where their imagination and input is as important as the work itself.

Holly Dickinson
       
     
Holly Dickinson

Holly’s interests centre on natural forms, movement and sensory experience. Her work is a culmination of these interests, often exploring all of them at once, through fantastical installations.

Gemma Batchelor
       
     
Gemma Batchelor

The fashion for bringing the outside inside has been common for centuries, in the form of pot plants that can be a common fern or an exotic aloe plant. Through photography, Gemma is interested in reflecting why people take these collections to an extreme; why they turn their domestic space into an indoor jungle.

Evelyn Hollow
       
     
Evelyn Hollow
Connie Hurley
       
     
Connie Hurley
Brodie Childs
       
     
Brodie Childs
Anna Vesaluoma
       
     
Anna Vesaluoma

The strange and the unexplainable attract human curiosity. Inspired by cabinets of curiosities, Anna’s paintings study the weird and wonderful in the creations of nature and people, boundaries and things out of place.

Alexandra Roddan
       
     
Alexandra Roddan

Alexandra is interested in the application of paint and the process involved in changing and developing the surface of a painting, through intuitive experimentation with materials and techniques.

Alex Weir
       
     
Alex Weir

Inspired by everything – advertising, conversations, music - Alex’s work is all about critiquing painting and what role the subject plays. He uses text, collage, layers and everyday materials to try answer the simple question ‘what is a painting?’.

Claire Pearce
       
     
Claire Pearce
Michael Kay
       
     
Michael Kay

Michael’s practice combines minimalist sculptural forms with video and contains an element of performance. By stripping away the unnecessary he forces us to focus on our own reality with a sense of wit and irony.

Rootmap
       
     
Rootmap

Ellie Walker, Holly Maltby and Alice Lowne founded ‘rootmap’, a map of Edinburgh’s sustainable and local food scene. They celebrate Edinburgh’s local food community using creativity and the arts, whilst encouraging others to also discover the joys of local food.

Stephanie Wilson
       
     
Stephanie Wilson
Connie Zhong
       
     
Connie Zhong

Connie’s work is where is where fashion, design and lifestyle all collide. Where east meets west.

Naomi Buchan
       
     
Naomi Buchan
Softbox Collective
       
     
Softbox Collective

Softbox Collective comprises of several 4th year photography students from Edinburgh College of Art. The work varies in conceptual and stylistic approaches, all of which come together to offer an insight into the diverse world of contemporary photography.

Keiran Mitchell
       
     
Keiran Mitchell

Through painting and installation, Keiran has a fascination with anatomy and in thinking about surface and themes of decay.

Heather Davidson
       
     
Heather Davidson

Knowledge is power': Heather’s piece is a live code installation discussing the meeting places between magic and technology and the dissemination of knowledge (and power).

Klaus Pinter
       
     
Klaus Pinter

Klaus uses art prints to animate an audience by getting the viewer to try out dance steps. Klaus’ work is a culmination of paper, music and dance, where the viewer can take prints away or fit various pieces together in new arrangements.

Tiki Muir
       
     
Tiki Muir

Tiki’s work is a video based installation that, through the ritual processes of hair removal, explores the gap between the personal and the general cultural conscious, and the control of image and self.

Thane Katsillis
       
     
Thane Katsillis

The desert offers nothing. Thane’s animation “The Desert Runner” takes on the idea that ‘the desert has nothing to offer and no man needs nothing’.

Elizabeth Bevington
       
     
Elizabeth Bevington

Elizabeth’s diptych “Reverie” is a tentative, curious and naive investigation into the uncertain state and nothingness of the mind as we dream. Wispy, translucent ghost-like forms float and drift into dark space, creating an ethereal atmosphere which becomes her personal visualisation of the form of dreams in suspended consciousness.

Kirstin McDonald
       
     
Kirstin McDonald
Sorour Fattahi
       
     
Sorour Fattahi
Lizzie Quirke
       
     
Lizzie Quirke
Anete Tišānova
       
     
Anete Tišānova
Green Funky
       
     
Green Funky
Elsa Kyander
       
     
Elsa Kyander

Elsa uses photography as a way of documenting events in the past. A footstep, graffiti that has been painted over or simply litter on the ground are all evidence of something that has been but is now long gone. Her work is a series of photos about the interaction of the past and the present.

Fionnuala Mottishaw
       
     
Fionnuala Mottishaw

Museums sculpt our understanding of the culture to which we belong. Fionnuala interacts with this to introduce a more complex narrative; translating the aesthetic through assertively handmade objects.

Beichen Yu
       
     
Beichen Yu
Auguste Greiciute
       
     
Auguste Greiciute
Megan Rea
       
     
Megan Rea

In her paintings, Megan is inspired by public spaces and how lines on the floor give the visitor subliminal instruction.

Shauna Emig
       
     
Shauna Emig
Alice Lazarus
       
     
Alice Lazarus

Alice focuses on the idea of sacred geometry, using line and colour within a print format. She is inspired by the way abstract geometry can be used to portray spiritual and philosophical ideas.

GLUE Collective
       
     
GLUE Collective

Glue collective, an international photography collective, is made up of a group of female photographers and recent Edinburgh College of Art graduates trying to make an impact on the world through photography.

Erin Semple
       
     
Erin Semple

Erin’s work with instant film increasingly considers how photography can be tangible and ambiguous whilst compelling her audience to feel nostalgic. “Neverland” is an observation of the millennial generation; those born between 1982 and 2002, and their changing habits and expectations. By disassembling her own life through the lens, Erin looks to examine a generation at odds with the conventions of ageing set by their predecessors.

Mairead Keating
       
     
Mairead Keating

Mairead combines social documentary and fine-art photography, with a key interest in the human condition and community engagement. The portraits of “Be, Still” examine the potential resting in a child. The contemplative and expressive features mark the endless possibilities and the journey to adulthood that children face.

Michelle Foster
       
     
Michelle Foster

Michelle’s sculptural installations explore the need to connect our emotional selves to feel congruent in the physical world - divisions in the psyche cause pain. Her practice regards art as a healing force to bridge this separation.

Genevieve Murray
       
     
Genevieve Murray

Technology seems to rule our world. The next generation are more absorbed and distracted by it than ever. In her painting, Genevieve highlights children’s constant and consuming interaction with technology with hopes that her figures do not represent future social conduct.